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LATEST POSTS2020-01-16T06:36:54+00:00

PREPARING FOR A TATTOO

No matter if you are getting your very first piece of body art, or if you are already covered in ink from head to toe, each experience is unique. And some slightly more… intense than others. In any case, it pays off to set yourself up as well as possible beforehand in order to make the experience as little traumatic as could be. We are kidding, its not that bad, really. It is actually an exciting endeavour, and whatever pain experienced is easily forgotten. Otherwise, why would everyone want to do it again? >>>

TATTOO LAWS WORLDWIDE – PART III

Denmark, as stated in a previous entry, was one of the first countries in Europe to embrace tattoo culture, when its king was seen on the cover of LIFE magazine bare-chested and with numerous tattoos from local Copenhagen artists in 1951. It is therefore ironic that it has the only law in the European Union regulating placement of body art. Since 1966, Danish law-makers has officially forbidden artists to tattoo on the face, neck, or hands. Many Danes do sport visible ink on these areas however, and it would seem any prison sentence (or whip-lashes for that matter) is yet to be dished out to the artists that have performed them. >>>

TATTOO LAWS WORLDWIDE – Part II

While the state laws on tattooing are not so harsh, should you get a traditional (and considered magic) Sak Yant tattoo by a Thai Buddhist monk, there are a number of rules of conduct to follow post-needle. The Sak Yant tattoos were originally done on warriors seeking strength and protection in battle and are still considered a manifestation of desire or intention. South East Asian communities consider these marking to be very powerful and that they bestow blessings on the bearer. >>>

TATTOO LAWS WORLDWIDE. Part I – Asia

Already in the 4th century, fishermen along the coast in what is today known as South Korea would get tattoos that were thought to ward off evil spirits and bring good luck. Then, as it was in many other places in the world, tattoos were used as a means to brand prisoners, and became associated with crime and vagrancy. Today (albeit still frowned upon by the older generation) a great number of young South Koreans are openly sporting various styles of ink as a form of self expression and creativity. >>>

TATTOO TRENDS 2020

Just last week, renowned tattoo artist Fuzi released the first issue of Seulment Pour La Vie, a magazine dedicated to contemporary tattooing. It sets out to show how tattooing has come to embrace almost every other area connected to the arts, such as photography, graphic design, graffiti, and architecture. >>>

A HISTORY OF TATTOOING TOOLS

A History Of Tattooing Tools — Ancient Tools and Techniques

The oldest preserved tattoo kit, found on the island of Tongpatu in Tonga, is a somewhat more quiet ancestor to its modern counterpart. Dated at 2,700 years old, the tools have been identified as ‘bone combs’, flat pieces of bone that have been shaped to have sharp points on one side. These points still have tiny bits of ink, and so there is no doubt as to their usage. The pieces were first discovered by archeologists in the 1960s, but at the time could not be identified and they were kept in storage until recently.  >>>

A HISTORY OF TATTOOING – PART I

The History Of Tattooing — Tattoos, Tools And People Through Millennia

Step into a tattoo studio today and you will hear the constant buzzing of machines, powered either by air pressure or an electric motor, as they penetrate the skin at a rate of anywhere between 50 to 3,000 times per minute. For some people, this sound invokes mild (at best) trepidation, for others, excited anticipation. You will see people from all walks of life getting their skin adorned with a myriad of styles and techniques: Old School, Blackwork, Neo-traditional, Watercolor, Black and Grey, and more. You can find a tattoo studio in almost any city in the world.  >>>